MEE Seminar - Multiscale Computation in Innovative Direct Conversion of Phonon Energy

Date: 
02/12/2014 - 10:00am - 11:00am

This seminar will be held in Discovery Park Room B142.

Speaker: Dr. Seungha Shin
from the University of Michigan

ABSTRACT

Since more energy from various sources is wasted as heat than harvested, finding solutions to effective thermal energy conversion and transport is important for efficient and sustainable energy systems. Thermal energy is stored mainly as phonon in solid in the atomic-scale perspective, and this phonon energy can be directly converted to harvestable energy by interaction. I introduce the heterobarrier structure for the direct phonon energy conversion energy to electric potential, and suggest this structure for in-situ recycling of the resistive-emitted (nonequilibrium) phonons in microelectronic devices. The multi-scale analysis on this system to address from the fundamental to application expects that this recycling can enhance the electron transport and the energy efficiency, reducing the operation temperature. I will also present my research on thermal energy transport across interfaces (for thermal management) and molecular junctions (for thermoelectricity and graphene composites), and molecular-gas laser cooling. This research employs energy related multi-scale computations based on fundamental examination of energy carriers, and particularly focuses on nonequilibrium carrier occupancy kinetics and heterostructures. Lastly, I will discuss my future research plans, including hot-phonon upconverter, graphene thermal transport and thermoelectric properties, and other hot phonon and junction applications.

BIO

Seungha Shin is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Heat Transfer Physics Laboratory at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan (Prof. Massoud Kaviany as advisor) in May 2013, and his M.S. and B.S. are from Seoul National University in 2003 and 2008, in Mechanical Engineering. His research is on fundamentals of energy transport and conversion with theoretical and multi-scale approaches. He was the recipient of the Rackham Graduate School Pre-doctoral Fellowship at the University of Michigan in 2011, and he was also selected as an official nominee of the Department of Mechanical Engineering for the university-wide Distinguished Dissertation Award. As a Graduate Student Instructor for the undergraduate course Heat Transfer